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Some of the worst market analysis ever!

I came across an article the other day which got my blood boiling a bit. It basically talks about trading the “spread” between the S&P 500 and EUR/JPY forex cross rate. The author was quite happy with himself for calling the spread being exceedingly wide and recommending a spread narrowing trade. He went so far as to say “Selling ES and going long EURJPY is now pretty much risk free.” I don’t know what anyone else’s definition of “risk free” is, but this trade certainly isn’t mine.

I don’t have any problem with the general idea underlying the trade that stocks and the EUR/JPY rate tend to trade in tandem. It’s been the case for quite a while now that when the market’s are feeling good and buying stocks EUR/JPY (and really all the JPY pairs) will rally, but when the markets are nervous and shifting into a risk aversion mode both the exchange rate and the stock market falls.

My issue with this analysis is this. The author is using a dual-axis plot of the S&P and EUR/JPY (meaning two price plots with different y-axis) to determine the “spread”. When there’s a gap between the lines there’s a spread. When there isn’t, the spread is zero. That would all be just fine if the S&P 500 and EUR/JPY were even close in price, which they aren’t.  At this writing the mini S&P contract is at about 1066 while EUR/JPY is right around 110. Notice how they are not anywhere close to zero?

This has got to be some of the worst analysis I’ve ever seen. Please, please, please don’t every employ this methodology – if you can even call it that.

And calling or implying this trade is some kind of arbitrage is even worse. There is absolutely no mathematical or other direct linkage between the S&P and EUR/JPY. That means no arbitrage, just a coincident relationship. It just so happens that in this market cycle they are trading based on the same main drivers. That could change at any time. That means you most definitely have risk.

Again, I’m not necessarily arguing against the idea of the trade (stocks and cross get back in line). I’m just saying the analysis used to get there is severely flawed and dangerous.

By John

Author of The Essentials of Trading

3 replies on “Some of the worst market analysis ever!”

John,

Allow me to enlighten you. A trade is declared to be ‘risk free’ when Scammer A can get Sucker B to pay a fee to learn how to make the risk free trade.

There is no denying that this trade is risk free for A.

Mark,

True enough, but I’m not suggesting anything of that sort is going on in this case. This is just an example of a flawed analytic methodology.

John