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A Reader’s Story About a Stop Getting Hit

A reader named Susan left this comment recently on the Some Not-So-Great Tips for Using Stop Orders post I wrote a while back. I think it does a great job of highlighting a situation – or at least a type of situation – which new traders find themselves in where stops are concerned.

I have a question, as a newbie to trading, and using things like stops, etc. We had purchased a stock that started to go up… after it was in profit, we placed a stop order, for about .15 below the current trading price. Until our stop order, the stock was steadily (fairly quickly) headed upwards… but just in case we were not at the screen, we thought we would try a stop order.

I can’t figure out if we did something wrong, or what happened. But this is my perception of what happened -… within seconds of my placed stop order, the stock price steadily dropped to my exact stop price, my shares sold, and then headed right back up to the previous high, to go on higher. All within 5 mins or less.

I am aware stock prices fluctuate, but to my eyes, it seemed my lower “steal of a sale price” was noticed, somehow snatched up, and thing continued on upwards.

Prices can fluctuate, and I guess coincidences can happen. Or the more obvious answer may be that I didn’t place the order correctly, or understand what was to happen once I did.

My understanding was that this price was to execute only if the stock (naturally) dropped.. not to sell at this price immediately (which would otherwise seem kinda MARKET….).

I know this isn’t the case, but it seemed as if someone could read our price, got the stock prices to go down, grabbed ours at a “deal/steal” and then got the stocks to start moving up again. But I can’t grasp what did happen, likely because I have no experience, so likely a misunderstanding of stops altogether, or movement of stocks, in the least.

Any help in understanding this? Thanks so much for your time.

OK. We don’t know what stock Susan is talking about here, so we don’t have a proper frame of reference for the price movements likely to be seen. That said, when I read that she was using a stop 0.15 below the market I just about fell over. I think most experienced stock traders would agree that this is probably way too close. A move like that for most stocks is little more than statistical noise. You’re almost guaranteed that it will get hit just as a result of normal price volatility created by the interaction of buy and sell orders hitting the market – or by news induced price swings.

Tightness of the stop aside, anyone who’s been in the markets for any length of time has seen at least one instance of their stop getting hit and the market basically turning right back around. It’s very annoying, of course, but if you need to expect it. All you can do is review the analysis you did in placing your stop there and see if that was the right decision given what you knew at the time.

There are, of course, situations where stops and other standing orders do get “run” by the market, where large players attempt to create price movement to trigger the execution of those orders. That really only happens when there are large numbers of stops all in a very obvious location, though. Chances are if you’re stop is hit it probably wasn’t any conscious act.